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Quotes From 10 Must-Read Short Stories

Short fiction has an ability to condense a story and extract its most vital essence. Typically ranging from a few pages to a few thousand words, these succinct tales often explore a single idea, theme, or character in depth, creating more tightly woven narratives that engage readers in engrossing and impactful ways.

For writers, the short story format also offers creative flexibility, allowing for experimentation with unconventional structures and narrative techniques. Authors such as Edgar Allan Poe contributed to the form's development, mid-century masters including J.D. Salinger and Kurt Vonnegut captivated new generations of short story readers, and modern wordsmiths such as Alice Munro continue to find innovative ways to demonstrate the format’s enduring strength and relevance.

This collection of quotes from short stories encompasses various genres and generations, but they all represent the power of this potent, pint-sized narrative form.

"The Tell-Tale Heart" by Edgar Allan Poe

Have I not told you that what you mistake for madness is but over-acuteness of the sense?

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First published in 1843, this chilling tale follows an unnamed narrator who insists on his own sanity while at the same time meticulously planning and executing the murder of an old man. The narrator is then tortured and driven to paranoia by the ensuing guilt — he even believes he can hear the victim’s heart beating from under the floorboards. Poe’s story is considered a masterpiece of Gothic literature, and its exploration of fear and the human psyche is a calling card of his macabre bibliography.

"For Esmé — with Love and Squalor" by J.D. Salinger

He was rather like a Christmas tree whose lights, wired in series, must all go out if even one bulb is defective.

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Salinger has been referred to as “the great poet of post-traumatic stress.” After he served in the Army during WWII and was treated for “combat fatigue” in a psychiatric hospital upon his return, themes of war and its mental impacts often appeared in his work. In this short story, “Sergeant X” is profoundly affected by a young girl named Esmé, and their correspondence offers him hope and healing after his return from duty. “For Esmé — with Love and Squalor” was originally published in The New Yorker in 1950 and later anthologized in Salinger's Nine Stories collection.

"Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" by Joyce Carol Oates

Everything about her had two sides to it, one for home and one for anywhere that was not home.

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“Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” follows teenage protagonist Connie as she navigates the tumultuous terrain of adolescence. Inspired by real events, Oates’ story is a haunting exploration of the vulnerability of youth and innocence, and an uncomfortably honest look at the darker aspects of society. It first appeared in the fall 1966 edition of Epoch magazine and has been lauded ever since.

"Cathedral" by Raymond Carver

You've got to work with your mistakes until they look intended.

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Narrated by a distrustful man whose wife has invited her friend, a blind man, to visit, “Cathedral” beautifully weaves through themes of insecurity, empathy, and masculinity until the narrator eventually arrives at a poignant truth about himself. First published in The Atlantic Monthly in 1981, “Cathedral” is a powerful example of Carver’s deceptively simple style and has become one of his most recognizable short stories.

"The Dead" by James Joyce

Better pass boldly into that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and wither dismally with age.

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"The Dead" is the concluding story in Joyce’s 1914 collection Dubliners, and its themes of time, family, and mortality serve as the perfect ending punctuation for the introspective anthology. The story follows Gabriel Conroy and his wife, Gretta, as they attend an annual family Christmas party in Dublin. It culminates with Gabriel becoming acutely aware of the history and memories of his own life and relationships, a moment that’s sure to stay with any reader long after they shut the book.

"The Bear Came Over the Mountain" by Alice Munro

She said that she’d counted on fences always taking you somewhere.

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This poignant story examines the 30-year marriage of Grant and Fiona as Fiona develops Alzheimer’s disease and enters a nursing home. Complex emotions and moral dilemmas come to the surface, highlighting Munro’s sensitive insights into human relationships. Originally published in The New Yorker in 1999, “The Bear Came Over the Mountain” later appeared in Munro’s 2001 collection Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage. In 2006, it was adapted by Canadian filmmaker Sarah Polley into the heartbreaking film Away From Her.

"EPICAC" by Kurt Vonnegut

If he were given a problem to which there was no solution, he would destroy himself trying to solve it.

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“EPICAC,” named for the story’s sentient computer initially designed for military use but eventually used to write love letters, is a prescient reflection on the nature of human emotion and artificial intelligence. Although it was originally published in 1950 (and later appeared in the popular collection Welcome to the Monkey House), Vonnegut’s thought-provoking exploration of the boundaries between human and machine and the limitations of technology felt ahead of its time — a hallmark of his darkly humorous writing.

"Sweat" by Zora Neale Hurston

Too late for everything except her little home. She had built it for her old days, and planted one by one the trees and flowers there. It was lovely to her, lovely.

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Zora Neale Hurston's "Sweat'' is renowned for its vivid portrayal of the African American experience in the early 20th century, particularly the challenges faced by Black women. The 1926 story and its themes of domestic abuse, resilience, and the pursuit of personal freedom showcase Hurston's skillful use of dialect and talent of developing her characters' inner lives, both of which helped make "Sweat" a powerful and enduring work in the African American literary canon.

"Landscape with Flatiron" by Haruki Murakami

Junko never said much in the presence of the fire … The flames accepted all things in silence, drank them in, understood, and forgave. A family, a real family, was probably like this, she thought.

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Set after the 1995 earthquake near Kobe, Japan, Murakami’s “Landscape with Flatiron” is permeated with melancholy as its main characters struggle with their past traumas. Murakami’s typical existential themes are found throughout the short story collection after the quake, first published in English in 2002. However, this particular story’s ability to capture the devastation the region felt in the wake of the natural disaster places it among the writer’s most effective short fiction.

"Everyday Use" by Alice Walker

I am the way my daughter would want me to be.

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Alice Walker may be best known for her novel The Color Purple, but the Georgia-born writer also has a trove of beautiful short stories. "Everyday Use," one of her most celebrated, revolves around a mother and her two daughters and the tensions surrounding their African American heritage, traditional values, and modernity. “Everyday Use” was first published in Harper's Magazine in 1973 and is included in Walker's seminal short story collection In Love & Trouble: Stories of Black Women.

Featured image credit: The Picture Art Collection/ Alamy Stock Photo

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About the Author
Nicole Villeneuve
Nicole is a writer, thrift store lover, and group-chat meme spammer based in Ontario, Canada.
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